Home » How to make Buttermilk from Yogurt | Check Easy Recipe

How to make Buttermilk from Yogurt | Check Easy Recipe

Buttermilk is the liquid left behind after churning butter out of cream. More generally, the name is applied to several similar fermented dairy drinks, commonly sold in most grocery stores. Yogurt is one such prevalent fermented dairy that is used for making buttermilk.

In this blog post, we will discuss the recipe of making buttermilk using yogurt:

Yogurt (curdled milk) and Buttermilk

Yogurt is a fermented milk product prepared by fermenting the mixture of milk and specific bacteria/yeast. This fermentation process converts lactose to lactic acid, which gives yogurt its tart flavor. Many people prefer making yogurt at home than buying it from grocery stores, as they feel that the yogurt tastes better when it is made at home.

Different types of bacteria are used to ferment milk, which produces different flavors and textures of yogurt. For the desired flavor, the ratio of milk to starter culture used in making yogurt is essential. If less starter culture (fewer bacteria) is added, the mixture becomes more acidic and gives a sour taste. Yogurt with more bacteria takes more time to ferment but preserves longer as it has a higher pH.

Yogurt is used as the base to make many flavored ferments, such as lassi (buttermilk) and kadhi (a type of soup/stew made with yogurt).

Yogurt can also be used to make buttermilk. Buttermilk is the liquid left behind after churning butter out of cream. More generally, the name is applied to several similar fermented dairy drinks, commonly sold in most grocery stores. Yogurt is one such prevalent fermented dairy that is used for making buttermilk.

In this blog post, we will discuss the recipe of making buttermilk using yogurt:

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How to make Buttermilk from Yogurt?

how to make buttermilk from yogurt?

Ingredients needed: –

1 cup plain yogurt/curd (see note)

1 cup water (see note)

Making yogurt/curd:

  1. Heat 1 liter of milk on a stove or in the microwave.
  2. The quantity of milk used does not matter; what matters is that the total volume should be around 1 liter after heating.
  3. Make sure you use whole-fat cow’s milk for making curd, as the required fat content for making good yogurt is 3.25%.
  4. Skimmed milk will not produce good results, so do not use skimmed or low-fat milk to make yogurt. Do not add any starter culture at this stage, as it will be added later.
  5. Stir the mixture gently while heating to avoid scalding of the bottom layer.
  6. The milk will start boiling within 5 to 10 minutes.
  7. Once it starts coming up, lower the heat and let it come to a boil again.
  8. Repeat this process one or two times until the milk is boiled well enough.
  9. If using a microwave, bring the milk to a boil in 6-7 intervals of 2 min each, stirring after every interval.
  10. It will take around 15 minutes to boil the milk.
  11. Once the milk boils well, turn off the heat.
  12. Allow it to cool down to 104-110 degrees F (around 40 degrees C).
  13. You can check this using a candy thermometer or insert your clean finger inside the pot/container.
  14. If you cannot hold your finger at this temperature, the milk is ready to set.
  15. Stir well once or twice while it cools down.
  16. Once the milk reaches around 110 degrees F, add 2-3 tablespoons of yogurt you had made earlier (refer notes) and mix it well.
  17. It must be at room temperature, so let the yogurt sit on the counter for some time before adding to the warm/hot milk.
  18. Do not add yogurt with starter culture at this stage, as the starter should be added only when the milk cools down.
  19. Cover and keep in a pre-heated oven for 6-8 hours or overnight to set the yogurt well.
  20. The oven light/heat will help maintain the required temperature to set the yogurt without any external heat.
  21. It can be prepared during night hours, and then yogurt will be ready to use the following day.
  22. If the oven is unavailable, keep it in a warm place (100 degrees F) for 8-10 hours or ferment at room temperature (75 degrees F) for 6-8 hours only.
  23. The time required for fermentation depends upon the surrounding temperature.
  24. The yogurt can be set/fermented in a casserole dish or any oven-proof pot for this purpose.
  25. Do not use aluminum pots, as these will react with yogurt and taint its taste.

Once the yogurt has set well (refer notes), you can either use it as is or whip it for making smooth yogurt.

Making buttermilk from yogurt

After the yogurt has been set, add 1 cup of water and mix well to get a homogenous mixture. The ratio should be 1:1 (yogurt: water). If you prefer a thicker consistency, adjust the quantity of water accordingly.

Now you can use this mixture to make buttermilk. To make 1 cup of buttermilk, add 2 teaspoons (or more for thicker consistency) of the prepared yogurt/water mixture in a cup and mix it well with ¾ cup of water. Add salt per taste and mix well to combine everything.

How much buttermilk can be made from 1 cup of yogurt?

1 cup of yogurt can make about 1.5 cups to 1.75 cups of buttermilk.

For making good quality buttermilk, use whole-fat cow’s milk (minimum 3.25% fat). If using buffalo milk, the required fat content is 7%.

Do not use any other starter culture except the one that you had made in an earlier batch. Otherwise, it will alter the taste of the final product.

The yogurt will come out good only when the milk used is total fat (minimum 3.25% fat). Skimmed/low-fat milk will not produce good results, so do not use it to make yogurt.

If you use store-bought plain yogurt without any preservatives, then the shelf life of prepared yogurt is around 5 days when refrigerated at normal room temperature (72 degrees F). The longer the time for fermentation, the better the taste and texture of the final product will be.

Use ice packs/cold packs/more relaxed pockets during the summer months to keep the prepared buttermilk cool.

You can make yogurt at home without any unique ingredients (no thermometer, no heating pad, etc.). Just follow this simple recipe which needs nothing other than milk and starter culture.

Yogurt should be kept covered when fermenting at room temperature to avoid any odor from the refrigerator.

If you make yogurt frequently, use a plain white plate/dish to ferment at room temperature. If kept in the open, the dangerous bacteria that grow in yogurt can be transferred to other dishes by careless handling. So wash the dish only with hot water and never again with detergent or soap until the next time you make some.

Yogurt should be consumed within the time indicated in notes. Otherwise, it may lead to a sour taste and an unpleasant odor.

The buttermilk prepared using the recipe is thicker than store-bought yogurt or buttermilk. You can add some water to thin it down if desired.

If you have not used whole fat milk to make yogurt, then use either boiled water or 1% milk to thin down the buttermilk prepared from that.

  • Usually, a 200 ml glass of whole fat yogurt will yield about 150 ml to 160 ml buttermilk (after adding water).
  • Buttermilk prepared from 1 cup of plain homemade yogurt will reduce to about 1 cup flat buttermilk (or thick buttermilk as per your desire).

If you do not mind the little sour taste and aroma of yogurt, then use boiled water or cold water to dilute it for making buttermilk.

Homemade yogurt is very cheap and nutritious too. It is a good idea to use it as a base for smoothies, milkshakes, etc. However, the taste and texture of such recipes made from homemade yogurt will vary slightly due to slight temperature changes (of milk used), the bacterial culture used, and fermentation time.